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Image #6: Ray Rasmussen, flower: Bleeding Heart (Dicentra spectabilis)

heart explosions
watching the one you love
love another

Mary Angela Nangini, Canada

The first line could be talking about the flowers in the picture blooming, but then takes us in a different direction; what's that song, "Love Hurts?" This certainly would hurt, but it's my favorite for this photo.

an'ya: This one is an interesting accompaniment to the photo, and perhaps might even be more of a senryu. It is original and so true to life.

bleeding hearts in bloom -
opening a valentine
from my ex-lover

Fran Masat, USA

soji: A very close second favorite. It might seem as though we have a series on broken hearts going on here, but again I like this one for the slight feint of naming the flowers in the picture, then going off in another direction.

Bleeding Hearts˜
if I did not know your name
I would have still guessed it

Zhanna P. Rader

an'ya: My first choice. I think it needs a little tweaking. Line 1 is just fine, although in line two, the rhythm of this haiku might be enhanced by saying "I didn't," and maybe rearranging line 3 to read:

Bleeding Hearts˜
if I didn't know your name
still I would have guessed it

soji: I'm not normally a fan of people talking to plants, planets or platypuses in a haiku, but this one caught my attention and wouldn't let go of it, so this one gets a nod. Somehow, while reading this, I feel like Elizabeth Barrett Browning is in the room. I agree with my esteemed co-judge that this could use a small tweak, but I think all it needs is "still" removed from the last line:

Bleeding Hearts -
if I did not know your name
I would have guessed it

Ah, now I can hear Eliza Dolittle saying that.

the jangle
of her charm bracelet
-be my valentine

Doris Kasson, US

an'ya: Yet another interesting take on this photo, and you'll have to admit, it does look somewhat like a charm bracelet, and it is nearing Valentine's Day. How differently each author perceives the same picture . . .